turkeyfood5

Christmas Turkey: How they eat it around the world

While it is true that some countries prefer other meats on Christmas Day, such as Germany whose people love their roast goose, and Iceland whose people have a fascination with reindeer meat, the fact remains that turkey is the mainstay of the dining room table during our festive season meals. Here are some interesting ways that this big bird will be eaten around the world during Christmas 2016!

A traditional Turkey Roast in Britain
A traditional Turkey Roast in Britain

In the UK and in much of Europe (and Australia), the traditional Christmas lunch consists of a sumptuous whole roast turkey, with all the trimmings!

Turkey Legs from the United States
Turkey Legs from the United States

At all times of the year, but especially so during Thanksgiving and Christmas periods, turkey legs rule the streets in the United States of America!

Tsofi is the local name for turkey tails
Tsofi is the local name for turkey tails in Ethiopia

While not all Ethiopians celebrate Christmas, turkey is nonetheless on the menu in the form of street food called Tsofi, which are roasted turkey tails!

A turkey and bean burrito
A turkey and bean burrito

If you wanted to add a little Mexicana to your Christmas, then a turkey and bean burrito may be your thing! Many Mexicans eat this in the run up to the big day itself!

turkeycurry
Turkey Curry

Christmas is a somewhat low key affair in India and Pakistan, however the people of these countries love their curry so much, that any halal meat – including turkey – will go well with a splattering of Dopiaza and rice!

Braai in Johannesburg - it's a total meat market!
Braai in Johannesburg – it’s a total meat market!

You can’t visit South Africa and not be impressed with their street food festivals known as braai. Here you will find roasted and grilled meats of all kinds (including ostrich!), and during the Christmas period roasted turkey is big business!

Turkey shawarma can often be sold in Dubai and Abu Dhabi
Turkey shawarma can often be sold in Dubai and Abu Dhabi

Many times as a special treat, many fast food outlets in the Middle-East will add turkey meat to their menus, and Emiratis in particular can enjoy a nice turkey shawarma!

Karaage Turkey is a Japanese speciality
Karaage Turkey is a Japanese speciality

Christmas may not be a national holiday in Japan, but using the same methods as karaage chicken, this deep-fried method works very well with the festive turkey and it provides a delectable snack for Japanese people up and down the country!

Turkey Carbonara
Turkey Carbonara

Originating in Italy (but now eaten everywhere), we have Turkey Carbonara. This is a great way of using your turkey leftovers from Christmas Day by adding pasta and a cheese sauce – and why not throw a few meatballs in for good measure?!

A great way to use leftovers!
A great way to use leftovers!

When all is said and done, the most popular way of utilising your leftovers from the Christmas Day festivities is to find some bread and make yourself a fulsome turkey sandwich. While the meat is known to be rather dry, it is nevertheless – at least in Europe – still part of the Christmas tradition!

So how do you eat yours? And I wish you all a very Merry Christmas and a pleasant year in 2017!

3 thoughts on “Christmas Turkey: How they eat it around the world

  1. OK – I have to take issue with your U.S. food entry again! Those terrible turkey legs are only really served at outdoor festivals, mostly in the summer! The traditional roast turkey in the U.K. photo is more like our holiday turkey. I know everyone likes to think Americans eat all sorts of fried, fast food stuff all year ’round, but most of us really don’t! In fact, I’ve seen those monster turkey legs but never even thought about buying and eating one!

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    1. Haha, maybe I was being too stereotypical about the American eating habits. 😉 Of course, for Thanksgiving etc American families also eat traditional turkey – but the turkey legs are also a treat at theme parks and on piers!

      Liked by 1 person

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